Reports

Frozen Local: Strategies for Freezing Locally Grown Produce for the K-12 Marketplace

Published December 11, 2012

Executive summary Farm to School programs, linking children in K-12 schools with locally grown foods and the farmers who produce them are growing by leaps and bounds across the United States. In 2012, more than 12,400 schools were engaged in Farm to School activities.1 In Minnesota, where the Institute for Agriculture...

Soil Carbon and the Offset Market: Practices, Players and Politics

Published September 17, 2012

A summary version of this piece is available in another IATP publication, entitled A Climate-smart Idea? Understanding the Politics, Practices and Players of the Agricultural Soil Carbon Market. The arcane topic of soil carbon sequestration has become an item of significant political debate around the edges of the U.N...

Grain Reserves and the Food Price Crisis: Selected Writings from 2008-2012

Published July 16, 2012

Foreword IATP is pleased to present this reader of recent writings on grain reserves. Storing food in times of plenty for use in times of scarcity is a prehistoric idea that still has relevance and importance today. In 2009, IATP decided to renew and refocus its work on grain reserves in light of the 2007-08 food...

Farm to Child Care: Opportunities and Challenges for Connecting Young Children with Local Foods and Farmers

Published June 18, 2012

Introduction Across the United States, interest in locally grown food has skyrocketed over the past ten years. Procurement of local and regionally grown foods by colleges, hospitals, retailers and other large buyers has dramatically increased, while farmers markets and other “direct market” channels are...

Making Public Agricultural Research Work for the Public: Research and the Farm Bill

Published May 21, 2012

The importance of the Farm Bill’s Research title is hard to overstate. It may not have a direct impact on people’s lives as the food assistance programs and farm programs do, but it is a crucial driver in the long-term direction of U.S. agriculture. Its impact goes far beyond the USDA research institutions...

Planting for the Future: Health and the Farm Bill

Published May 15, 2012

In the U.S., and increasingly around the world, it’s very easy for consumers to find high-calorie, high-sugar, nutrient-poor foods, including sugar sweetened drinks, fast foods and highly processed snack foods. This food environment is one where such foods are aggressively marketed, easily accessible and often...

International Standards for Trade in Nano-coated Produce?

Published May 8, 2012

Nanotechnology-based food and health products and food packaging materials are available to consumers in some countries already, and additional products and applications are currently in the research and development stage, and some may reach the market soon. In view of such progress, it is expected that nanotechnology...

Bugs in the System

Published May 1, 2012

Executive summary Basic microbiology and the principle of natural selection dictate that antibiotic use will tend to spur bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics. This fact underlays growing concern about the public health effects of the 29 million pounds of antibiotics sold annually for animal agriculture,...

This Land, Our Land: Rural Development, Energy and Conservation in the Farm Bill

Published April 26, 2012

Rural America makes up only 16 percent of the U.S. population, but 90 percent of the land.1 Most of the resources we depend upon—food, water, energy, fiber and minerals—are either derived from or heavily impacted by rural land use, and stewarded by rural community members. These resources are imperative to...

Enough to Eat: Food Assistance and the Farm Bill

Published April 23, 2012

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp program) is the nation’s largest and most important food assistance program. The original Food Stamp program was created to provide both a new market for farmers’ surplus crops and relief for Americans living in poverty....