Overturning Citizens United

NAFTA Portal

Since NAFTA negotiations began in 1990, IATP has been a leading voice in criticizing how the agreement has subverted local democracy and benefited corporate agribusiness over farmers, consumers, and communities in all three countries. 

As NAFTA re-negotiation commences, we have assembled over 25 years of our research and analysis into this portal to serve as a resource for the Fair Trade movement to inform current advocacy and activism for a new NAFTA that works for people and the planet.

We've organized the portal so that blogs are below and documents to the right. We're trying to curate this in a way where the most interesting content is near the top, but if you're looking for a specific NAFTA topic, use the search bar. 

This portal is a work in progress, as we continue to rediscover material. It is very possible, especially with older online documents, that not all links work, but we haven't been able to test the tens of thousands of them that exist in the collection. Also, many of the old documents only existed in print before now. We have put PDFs online, but have yet to convert them to searchable text.

We'll continue to make improvements, as well as adding the new material we are generating on NAFTA as it is released. If you have feedback about the content, or additional information/documentation that you think is relevant to this portal, please send an email to Patti Landres, plandres@iatp.org

 

 

NAFTA Portal Blog

Trump's racist agenda is not fair trade

The racist and bigoted policies, statements, posture, and transparent intentions of the President of the United States Donald Trump are fueling the white supremacy movement. His racism and bigotry can and should be seen as building the conditions for the murder of one and deaths of three people in total last night in Charlottesville, Virginia.  

May Day, Chicago, NAFTA, and solidarity

This week we celebrate May Day, the International Day of Workers’ Rights. The days’ origins are in the Haymarket Affairs in Chicago in 1886, when labor activists were killed for advocating for an 8-hour workday.