Climate Change https://www.iatp.org/ en Carbon markets have no place in climate policy, will not help agriculture https://www.iatp.org/documents/carbon-markets-have-no-place-climate-policy-will-not-help-agriculture <div data-history-node-id="44158" class="node node--type-document node--view-mode-rss field-primary-category-climate-change has-field-primary-category no-field-teaser-image title-not-empty ds-1col clearfix"> <h3 > A new factsheet released by Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) and National Family Farm Coalition (NFFC) warns of the ineffectiveness of carbon markets and how they will not help agriculture. </h3> <div class="field field--name-field-author-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author (free form)</div> <div class="field--item"><p>IATP and NFFC</p> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/PRESS%20RELEASE_Carbon%20Markets%20in%20Agriculture.pdf">Download the PDF of the release.</a></em></p> <p><span><strong>MINNEAPOLIS</strong>—Carbon markets have a bad track record yet remain a default recommendation in policy proposals promising the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In practice, these markets enable the perpetuation of pollution, environmental injustices and fraud. Successful climate and agriculture policies must not include carbon markets, caution <a href="https://www.iatp.org/">IATP</a> and <a href="https://nffc.net/">NFFC</a> in the <a href="https://www.iatp.org/documents/why-carbon-markets-wont-work-agriculture">new factsheet</a>. </span></p> <p><span>The price of carbon credits has historically been too low to effectively reduce GHG emissions. In addition, polluters often move their operations outside of a carbon market area to evade regulation. With most power plants and polluting industries located near low-income, minority and other disadvantaged communities, carbon markets disproportionately impact these communities. </span></p> <p><span>When it comes to agriculture, carbon markets are especially detrimental. Soil carbon offsets count carbon sequestered in the soil as mitigation for carbon emissions elsewhere. However, tools to measure soil carbon accurately and reliably do not exist. In addition, soil carbon storage is highly impermanent; a change in land management practices or severe weather events can release carbon from the soil rapidly. While public resources should support farmers to integrate conservation practices into their operations, they should not be tied to a volatile carbon market that could make farming more economically unstable. Ultimately, paying farmers for soil carbon offsets treats agricultural land simply as a carbon sink, discounting its other functions such as production for local food systems. </span></p> <p><span>According to Jim Goodman, retired organic dairy farmer in Wisconsin and NFFC board president, “The last thing we should be doing is turning carbon into another commodity to be sold or traded in the global economy. Carbon markets will do nothing to reduce GHG emissions. All they will do is create another way for polluters to profit from their lack of environmental concern.”</span></p> <p><span>For several years, family farmers have struggled with low prices, sinking incomes and increasing climate disruptions, and carbon markets will not provide a solution to these challenges. In fact, farmers are already speaking out against the detriments of carbon markets. </span></p> <p><span>Elizabeth Henderson, an organic CSA farmer with NOFA-New York, says, "As a farmer, I reject solutions like carbon markets that leave power in the hands of the dominant corporations that have led us to the farm crisis we have been living through. Instead, we need public policy that incentivizes a culture of soil health, paying farmers for healthy soils practices and the ecological services that come with them, like reducing erosion, building farm resilience to climate extremes of drought and heavy rains and increasing soil carbon." </span></p> <p><span>Jason Jarvis, a commercial fisherman in Rhode Island on the board of Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance, adds that the national fisheries “Catch Share” policies further privatizing fisheries access were modeled after carbon cap-and-trade. “In the same way that Catch Shares have not saved the fish or fishermen, carbon markets won't solve the climate problem." </span></p> <p><span>Addressing the climate crisis and ensuring a just transition will take forward-thinking public investment combined with strong regulation. Carbon markets will not contribute to these goals. Rather, they let big polluters off the hook, fail the needs of family farmers and fishermen and ignore innovative community-based approaches.</span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-upload field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Upload</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"><span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf icon-before"><span class="file-icon"><span class="icon glyphicon glyphicon-file text-primary" aria-hidden="true"></span></span><span class="file-link"><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/PRESS%20RELEASE_Carbon%20Markets%20in%20Agriculture.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=204686" title="Open file in new window" target="_blank" data-toggle="tooltip" data-placement="bottom">PRESS RELEASE_Carbon Markets in Agriculture.pdf</a></span><span class="file-size">199.89 KB</span></span></div> <div class="field--item"><span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf icon-before"><span class="file-icon"><span class="icon glyphicon glyphicon-file text-primary" aria-hidden="true"></span></span><span class="file-link"><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL_0.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=842373" title="Open file in new window" target="_blank" data-toggle="tooltip" data-placement="bottom">2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL_0.pdf</a></span><span class="file-size">822.63 KB</span></span></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-primary-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Primary category</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/issues/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 05 Feb 2020 15:34:52 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44158 at https://www.iatp.org A false solution: Why carbon markets don’t work for agriculture https://www.iatp.org/blog/202002/false-solution-why-carbon-markets-dont-work-agriculture <span>A false solution: Why carbon markets don’t work for agriculture</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Wed, 02/05/2020 - 09:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>After too many years of inaction, climate policies are rapidly being introduced at the state and federal levels. Despite their poor track record, carbon markets feature heavily in many forthcoming climate policy proposals. A <span>new <a href="https://www.iatp.org/documents/why-carbon-markets-wont-work-agriculture">factsheet</a> </span>jointly released by IATP and the <a href="https://nffc.net/">National Family Farm Coalition</a> (NFFC) details why carbon markets will not work for agriculture.</span></span></span></p></div> Wed, 05 Feb 2020 15:00:00 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44156 at https://www.iatp.org Why Carbon Markets Won't Work for Agriculture https://www.iatp.org/documents/why-carbon-markets-wont-work-agriculture <div data-history-node-id="44157" class="node node--type-document node--view-mode-rss field-primary-category-climate-change has-field-primary-category no-field-teaser-image title-not-empty ds-1col clearfix"> <div class="field field--name-field-author-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author (free form)</div> <div class="field--item"><p>IATP and National Family Farm Coalition </p> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><strong><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL.pdf">Download the PDF of the factsheet.</a></strong></em></p> <p>Despite their poor track record, carbon markets have become the default recommendation for many climate policy proposals at the state and national level. These markets have not led to real, sustainable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions, pose direct risks to the health and economic security of communities and distract from stronger policies that better reflect the urgency of the climate crisis. Family farmers struggling with sinking incomes, low prices and increasing climate disruptions need a strong, stable policy framework that supports longterm climate and economic resilience. As agriculture is increasingly integrated into climate proposals, we must ensure that it does not get tied to risky carbon markets.</p> <h3>WHAT IS A CARBON MARKET?</h3> <p>A carbon market sets a cap on allowable GHG emissions with that cap declining as the years go on to gradually meet emissions reduction goals. The government issues emissions credits that add up to the cap on emissions. Covered entities can buy and sell emissions credits as necessary, creating a financial incentive for them to pollute less. In practice, these markets are full of loopholes that allow polluters to continue to pollute.</p> <h3>WHY CARBON MARKETS DON’T WORK</h3> <h4>Emission credit prices are too low</h4> <p>A World Bank Report estimates that to meet the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement, emission credit prices need to be between $40-80 by 2020. By comparison, credits in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a carbon market encompassing nine northeastern states, sold for between $5-6 for all of 2019, and the California carbon market’s credits sold for around $17 throughout 2019. These prices are far too low to drive down emissions. A recent analysis found that oil and gas company emissions in California have gone up in the period the California carbon market has been active. Polluters benefit when carbon credits are cheap and abundant and have even succeeded in getting most of their credits for free.</p> <h4>Leakage and offsets</h4> <p>Leakage is a phenomenon where covered entities move their operations outside of the market’s area to areas with less stringent climate rules. This makes it appear as though the market has reduced emissions even though overall emissions rise. Many carbon markets allow offsetting, where a reduction in GHG emissions in one sector is allowed to compensate for emissions elsewhere. Frequently, offsets are not additional (new practices) or permanent, thereby failing to meaningfully reduce GHG emissions while allowing polluters to continue polluting. Some carbon markets, including California’s, allow offsets from outside the market’s boundaries and sometimes from outside the country. This leads to even less accountability, and in many cases, fraud.</p> <h4>Environmental justice impacts</h4> <p>Many rural communities oppose carbon markets because they disproportionately impact low-income, minority and other disadvantaged communities. One company can buy up a large amount of credits to continue emitting or even increase their emissions, thus shirking responsibilities to address localized impacts from pollution. Because most power plants and polluting industries are situated in or near low income communities and communities of color, the continuing or even increased pollution in certain locations will harm those communities disproportionately. Internationally, carbon credit projects have long been linked to land grabbing and exploitation of small-scale farmers and rural communities.</p> <h3>WHY AGRICULTURE SHOULDN’T BE PART OF A CARBON MARKET</h3> <h4>Inadequate measurement tools</h4> <p>The tools to measure soil carbon to the degree of accuracy and reliability that a market would require do not currently exist. A recent study showed that three commonly-used measurement tools for soil carbon all yielded different results. Other studies show that focusing on the top 6 to 12 inches of the soil profile may overestimate the amount of carbon sequestered through no-till. Another challenge is how much soil carbon stocks differ geographically. Even in apparently uniform fields, soil carbon content may vary by as much as fivefold. Without measurement tools that are accurate, quantifying soil carbon to use in a carbon market is a guessing game and does not guarantee actual emissions reductions.</p> <h4>Impermanence</h4> <p>Soil carbon offsets allow carbon sequestered in the soil to count as mitigation for emissions elsewhere. The problem is that soil carbon storage is extremely impermanent; any carbon sequestered in the soil can be released with a change in land management practices or through severe weather events. Much of the carbon sequestered from no-till aggregates near the soil surface, where it’s vulnerable to rapid oxidation after even a single tillage pass. Most no-till farmers till once every several years to deal with weeds, which releases much of the carbon stored. Even long-term contracts that bind land managers to use certain practices do not ensure permanence since the carbon stored can be released back into the atmosphere as soon as the contract is up if the land manager returns to less climate-friendly practices.</p> <h4>Volatile prices</h4> <p>Under these programs, farmers are responsible for implementing land management practices to sequester carbon. Transitioning to conservation practices such as cover crops, no-till and diversified rotations can require different equipment, inputs and knowledge. Historically, carbon credit prices have been far too low to fairly incentivize such large-scale land management changes.While public resources should support farmers to integrate conservation practices into their operations, they should not be tied to a volatile market that could make farming more economically unstable. </p> <h4>Carbon markets undermine more effective and holistic agricultural practices</h4> <p>Paying farmers for soil carbon offsets treats agricultural land narrowly as a carbon sink. Production for local food systems becomes a secondary function of farmland, bringing with it a range of social, economic and food justice concerns, particularly in areas where corporate retailers are divesting from rural communities.There are multiple benefits of a climate-friendly agricultural system, including healthier soils, clean water, wildlife habitat, and farm resilience to drought and flooding. Research shows that integrated systems of practices based on sound agroecological principles have the greatest potential to mitigate agricultural GHG emissions, sequester and stabilize soil carbon, and attain the full measure of a productive and resilient agricultural system. Practices designed primarily to generate carbon credits will not lead to such innovative and comprehensive approaches. Furthermore, offset projects in a carbon market tend to work best for large-scale farms, raising concerns that corporate investment in carbon markets will contribute to further consolidation of agricultural land and disadvantage small to mid-sized farmers. Focusing on resilient agroecological systems rather than on the amount of carbon sequestered can benefit farmers of all sizes. </p> <h3>HOW TO MOVE FORWARD</h3> <p>The urgency of the climate crisis and the systemic economic challenges facing rural America require us to advance policies that result in real GHG reductions while prioritizing the needs and interests of rural, frontline and farming communities most impacted by climate change. We need proven regulatory approaches that hold big polluters accountable. </p> <p>To complement necessary regulatory approaches, we need programs that support climate-friendly agricultural and land management practices and improve farm profitability for those living on and working the land. Examples of predictable public funding for farmers to build resilient operations exist. Federal farm conservation programs including the Conservation Stewardship Program and the Environmental Quality Incentives Program provide cost-share for farmers who want to use conservation practices. These programs are regularly over-enrolled and need increased funding to allow more farmers to access them. In addition, some states are creating their own programs to address the challenge. The cover crop program through the Maryland Department of Agriculture significantly improved water quality in the Chesapeake Bay area by paying farmers to plant cover crops. The California Healthy Soils Program provides financial assistance for implementing conservation practices that improve soil health and sequester carbon. These state programs are successful examples of supporting climate-friendly agriculture outside of an offset market.</p> <p>Corporate control of our food and agriculture system is antithetical to efforts to address the climate crisis. Expanding farmer conservation programs must be linked to strong antitrust enforcement, checks on corporate power and limitations on industry access to public programs targeted for family farmers. Examples include using supply management to raise farmgate prices while limiting over-production of commodity crops, addressing corporate concentration in the agriculture sector, strengthening the rights of contract farmers in animal agriculture and limiting corporate ownership of agricultural land, particularly in communities of color.</p> <p>Addressing the climate crisis and ensuring a just transition will take forward-thinking public investment combined with strong regulation. Carbon markets will not get us there. They let big polluters off the hook, fail the needs of the family farming sector and ignore innovative community-based approaches. If Congress wants to maximize soil carbon sequestration and reduce emissions from agriculture, it should take proactive efforts to scale-up public resources for conservation practices while enacting commonsense checks on corporate concentration in the agriculture sector.</p> <p>Download the full factsheet <strong><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL.pdf">here</a></strong>. </p></div> <div class="field field--name-upload field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Upload</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"><span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf icon-before"><span class="file-icon"><span class="icon glyphicon glyphicon-file text-primary" aria-hidden="true"></span></span><span class="file-link"><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2020-02/2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=842373" title="Open file in new window" target="_blank" data-toggle="tooltip" data-placement="bottom">2020_01_CarbonMarketsAndAg_FINAL.pdf</a></span><span class="file-size">822.63 KB</span></span></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-primary-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Primary category</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/issues/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 04 Feb 2020 19:04:09 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44157 at https://www.iatp.org 2020 – A year and decisive decade of climate reckoning: What policymakers do next on agriculture matters https://www.iatp.org/blog/202002/2020-year-and-decisive-decade-climate-reckoning-what-policymakers-do-next-agriculture <span>2020 – A year and decisive decade of climate reckoning: What policymakers do next on agriculture matters </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Mon, 02/03/2020 - 15:16</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><strong>This blog is the second in a series of two posts about agriculture in the U.N. climate negotiations and what to look for in 2020. </strong></em><strong><em>Read the first blog post <a href="https://www.iatp.org/blog/202001/young-mighty-youth-are-making-difference-climate-talks">here</a>.  </em></strong></p></div> Mon, 03 Feb 2020 21:16:36 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44152 at https://www.iatp.org Young but mighty: The youth are making a difference at climate talks https://www.iatp.org/blog/202001/young-mighty-youth-are-making-difference-climate-talks <span>Young but mighty: The youth are making a difference at climate talks</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/28/2020 - 16:45</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><em><strong><span>This blog is the first in a series of two posts about agriculture in the U.N. climate negotiations and what to look for in 2020. This blog post was written by youth activists and guest bloggers Amélie Dupendant and Lorine Azoulai, who attended a UNFCCC COP for the first time as YOUNGO representatives in December 2019. Read the YOUNGO statement, presented at the agriculture discussions at COP 25 <a href="https://unfccc.int/sites/default/files/resource/Youngo%20Statement.pdf">here</a>. </span></strong></em></span></span></p> <p> </p></div> Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:45:12 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44150 at https://www.iatp.org EU-Mercosur deal lets agribusiness off the hook and exacerbates climate crisis https://www.iatp.org/blog/201912/eu-mercosur-deal-lets-agribusiness-hook-and-exacerbates-climate-crisis <span>EU-Mercosur deal lets agribusiness off the hook and exacerbates climate crisis</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/02/2019 - 11:34</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>In August, out-of-control fires in the Amazon brought home the connections between the destruction of the rain forest, </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/08/23/americas/brazil-beef-amazon-rainforest-fire-intl/index.html"><span>factory farms producing meat</span></a><span> for international markets and global warming. Media attention may have moved on to newer wildfires in California and Australia, but destructive agribusiness practices in the Amazon basin continue.</div> Mon, 02 Dec 2019 17:34:18 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44101 at https://www.iatp.org House needs to go big to address climate crisis https://www.iatp.org/blog/202001/house-needs-go-big-address-climate-crisis <span>House needs to go big to address climate crisis</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Fri, 11/22/2019 - 11:38</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>The visceral threats of the climate crisis, experienced through recent <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/21/climate/farms-climate-change-crops.html?action=click&amp;module=News&amp;pgtype=Homepage">Midwest floods</a> and California’s <a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/california-wildfire-danger-pg-e-new-preventive-outages-parts-of-california-today-2019-11-20/">wildfire-linked power outages,</a> are fueling a new sense of political urgency.</div> Fri, 22 Nov 2019 17:38:49 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44095 at https://www.iatp.org IATP Comment to the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis https://www.iatp.org/documents/iatp-comment-house-select-committee-climate-crisis-0 <div data-history-node-id="44098" class="node node--type-document node--view-mode-rss field-primary-category-climate-change has-field-primary-category no-field-teaser-image title-not-empty ds-1col clearfix"> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about/staff/ben-lilliston" hreflang="en">Ben Lilliston</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about/staff/dr-steve-suppan" hreflang="en">Dr. Steve Suppan</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about/staff/tara-ritter" hreflang="en">Tara Ritter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/about/staff/karen-hansen-kuhn" hreflang="en">Karen Hansen-Kuhn</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><strong>IATP submitted the following comment to the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis on November 21. </strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2019-11/House%20Climate%20Cmt%20Comment%20Final_0.pdf"><em>Download the full comment PDF.</em></a></p> <p>The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) thanks the Committee for seeking input on the climate crisis, the most critical challenge of our time. IATP is a 33-year-old nonprofit 501(c)3 organization based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. IATP works to ensure fair and sustainable food, farm and trade systems. For more than a decade we have advocated for policies at the intersection of climate, agriculture and trade policy that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while supporting and empowering farmers and rural communities to both adapt to and mitigate climate change.</p> <p>IATP has worked on-the-ground with Minnesota rural communities to develop local climate action plans. We have advocated at the national level to integrate climate goals within the Farm Bill and financial regulation. We have pushed for reforms in United States trade policy to enable climate action and reduce GHGs. IATP has been an advocate at United Nations agencies, including the Committee on World Food Security, to advance agroecology as a solution to food security and climate challenges. And IATP has actively attended most of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties over the last decade.</p> <p>IATP believes the climate crisis demands urgent and bold action, grounded in equity, to reshape our economy. For this reason, IATP supports the structural reforms and integration of social and racial justice goals outlined within the Green New Deal. Farmers and rural residents are on the front lines of the climate crisis with deep ties to natural resource-based economies. Farmers are dealing with six straight years of low prices, often below the cost of production, and rising debt and farm bankruptcies. Climate policies need to reflect these economic challenges and provide a path forward that reduces emissions and spurs a more equitable economy.</p> <p>In this comment to the Committee, IATP identifies a series of concrete policy recommendations in the following broad areas: </p> <ul><li>The Farm Bill and other agriculture-related programs</li> <li>Regulating GHG emissions </li> <li>Financial regulations</li> <li>Trade policy</li> </ul><p>As a whole, IATP believes these reforms would result in real GHG emission reductions and aid farmers and rural communities in making a transition toward more climate-resilient and economically just systems – both in the U.S. and around the world.  </p> <p><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2019-11/House%20Climate%20Cmt%20Comment%20Final_0.pdf"><em>Download the full comment to read more. </em></a></p></div> <div class="field field--name-upload field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Upload</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field--item"><span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf icon-before"><span class="file-icon"><span class="icon glyphicon glyphicon-file text-primary" aria-hidden="true"></span></span><span class="file-link"><a href="https://www.iatp.org/sites/default/files/2019-11/House%20Climate%20Cmt%20Comment%20Final_0.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=438708" title="Open file in new window" target="_blank" data-toggle="tooltip" data-placement="bottom">House Climate Cmt Comment Final_0.pdf</a></span><span class="file-size">428.43 KB</span></span></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-primary-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label">Primary category</div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/issues/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 21 Nov 2019 19:21:39 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44098 at https://www.iatp.org A call for climate-focused agriculture policy https://www.iatp.org/blog/202002/call-climate-focused-agriculture-policy <span>A call for climate-focused agriculture policy</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34897" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cecelia Heffron</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/20/2019 - 12:29</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>This <a href="https://sustainableagriculture.net/blog/a-call-for-climate-focused-agriculture-policy/">blog</a> was originally posted by the <a href="https://sustainableagriculture.net/">National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition</a> on November 18, 2019. </em></p></div> Wed, 20 Nov 2019 18:29:25 +0000 Cecelia Heffron 44089 at https://www.iatp.org The climate crisis requires government action: regulate Big Ag, transition to agroecology https://www.iatp.org/nature-based-solutions-for-livestock <span>The climate crisis requires government action: regulate Big Ag, transition to agroecology</span> <span><span lang="" about="/about/staff/account/colleen-borgendale" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Colleen Borgendale</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/23/2019 - 08:51</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As world leaders gather at the <a href="https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/un-climate-summit-2019.shtml">U.N. Climate Action Summit</a> in New York, the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP), in its <a href="https://www.iatp.org/nature-based-solutions-livestock">new publication</a>, calls on U.N. member governments to tackle agricultural emissions head on by redirecting public funds away from Big Ag, ending agribusiness impunity and transitioning farming to a growing movement of regenerative agriculture called Agroecology. The U.N.</div> Mon, 23 Sep 2019 13:51:05 +0000 Colleen Borgendale 44060 at https://www.iatp.org